10 November 2019

As a barber, how do you see your role as ‘advisor/therapist’ to some of your clients?

Hair director to the stars, Hamish Glianos, explains why it’s good to check in with friends.
Men's Health | Real Stories | In the Barber Chair
1 MIN READ

Hair director to the stars, Hamish Glianos, explains why it’s good to check in with friends.
 
Hamish Glianos is usually more comfortable on the other side of the Barber’s Chair!  As one of the creative minds and master stylists behind Selvedge Barbers, Hong Kong’s most popular spot for sick fades and straight razor shaves, we convinced Hamish to swap roles and spend a few moments in the comfort of the Barber’s Chair to find out more about why he supports Movember.
 
 
What has inspired you to support Movember? 
 
My support for Movember is slightly patriotic as I remember when The Movember Foundation launched in Australia and was proud that such a great initiative was born there.  Personally, I believe men’s health is an important issue and being in a position to assist raising awareness for this just means I am doing my very small part.  
 
In addition, my brother is suffering from a terminal cancer and sadly, out of fear, he lived with and suppressed his symptoms for a very long time before seeing a doctor for diagnosis.  Because of his case, I am able to be more open about my feelings and ailments which have a direct impact on my health and wellbeing.  As a family we are closer and more supportive of each other and much more aware of the steps we must take to maintain future health and wellbeing.
 
I believe Movember has done a great job of removing the barrier to empower men to confront health issues head on.  
 
This means that it is ok to NOT be ok and that it is vitally important to check with others, are they ok.
 
As a barber, how do you see your role as ‘advisor/therapist’ to some of your clients? 
 
My role is simple...I am here to offer a service and help my clients to feel and look better. Listening is the best therapy for anyone!
 
Why do you think it’s more challenging for men to speak out about men’s health issues?  
 
Traditionally, men feel a sense of responsibility to always be brave and strong.  I guess if they are depressed or have a health issue, they might feel embarrassed and less inclined to be open about it.
 
What’s your best advice this Movember? 
 
Grow your best Mo and be social and make noise.  The more Movember advocates, the more awareness it brings.